Intermission (3) – Current News on The Hump — Pacific Paratrooper

Note
The B-24 that crashed was a B-24 J. This is a B-24 D, an older model.

At 7:40 a.m. Jan. 25, 1944, five B-24 Liberator heavy bombers from the 308th Bombardment Group, 425th Squadron, took off from their base at Kunming, China, on a routine supply run to India. Their route took them over the Hump, a treacherous eastern stretch of tall peaks in the Himalayan mountains. At 10:45 a.m., flying […]

via Intermission (3) – Current News on The Hump — Pacific Paratrooper

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A Dawn Like Thunder By Robert J. Mrazek

Great book review by Plane Dave

This is the author’s Website.

http://adawnlikethunder.net/book.html

About the men

http://adawnlikethunder.net/men.html

 

Plane Dave

The True Story of Torpedo Squadron Eight

This is an excellent look at a pivotal period from an unusual perspective. I’ve read several unit histories. Often they are a bit dull, except presumably to those with a close connection to the unit.  But this book really stands out for several reasons.  First is just that the squadron’s period of activity is so key to the history of the Pacific War. Torpedo Eight was operational from late 1941 to late 1942, but more to the point the unit saw action at the Battle of Midway and in the Guadalcanal campaign.
The book further stands out for telling the story at a very human level while weaving anecdotes and reminiscences into the greater historic narrative.  So we get a nice balance of exciting, tragic and funny combined with why these things mattered. It is an extremely effective way of writing such a…

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Ready for Battle?

Jacques Chevrier

Colorised photo courtesy Richard Molloy

A group of pilots of No 1 Squadron RCAF, gather round one of their Hawker Hurricane Mark Is at Prestwick, Scotland.
30 October 1940.

The Squadron Commanding Officer, Squadron Leader E A McNab, stands fifth from the right, wearing a forage cap.

Left to Right: Frank Hillock, Toronto ON; Frederick Watson, Winnipeg MB; Robert Norris, Saskatoon SK; Norman Richard Johnstone, Winnipeg MB; Joseph A. J. Chevrier, Saint-Lambert QC; John David Morrison, Regina SK; Sq/Ldr Ernest Archibald McNab, Rosthern, SK; Arthur Yuile, Montréal QC; Paul Pitcher, Montréal QC; William Sprenger, Montréal QC; and Dean Nesbitt, Montréal QC. It is interesting to note that all five men on the right are from Montréal.

No. 1 Squadron RCAF left for Great Britain in June of 1940, with the Battle well under way. After a short period of training in England, they became the only RCAF Squadron involved in the Battle of Britain, first engaging the enemy on 23 August 1940. The following year, No. 1 became 401 Squadron. 401 Squadron ended the war as the RAF 2nd Tactical Air Force’s highest scoring fighter squadron with 186.5 victories—29 of which were earned during the Battle of Britain.

(Photo source – © IWM CH 1733)
Royal Air Force official photographer
Devon S A (Mr)

(Colourised by Richard James Molloy from the UK)
www.facebook.com/colourbyRJM

Airfix Boulton Paul Defiant Mk I – First steps

Having a rainy day is a great incentive to start building what I bought seven months ago.

One thing Airfix did was to provide us with clear instructions.

Some cockpit parts are delicate, and I broke part C21 when I removed it from the sprue. Luckily it won’t show.

The rest of the assembly was easy except for installing part D28.

Installing parts D20 and D21 was a breeze.

Next time on My Forgotten Hobby, Step 12 which I already did taking advantage of a sleeping cat…

 

 

Where was I the last time when I finished my last build?

Where was I the last time when I finished my last build?

Building Monogram 1/48 scale SBD Dauntless.

Where was I the last time when I finished my last build? I had found all about Gérard Pelletier, a French-Canadian air gunner, who is missing since September 3rd, 1942.

 

Then I bought some model kits…

And created a blog about RAF 264 Squadron, and along the way finding a new addictive hobby…

Colorising photos!

Avro Anson

 

A mail carrier B-17 with the RCAF

 

Learning more about Buzz Beurling

 

More on these 425 Alouette Squadron airmen

About a postwar Mosquito in Canada

 

More 425 Alouette Squadron airmen

 

Ground crew posing with a RCAF 410 Squadron Defiant based at RAF Drem

A French-Canadian fighter pilot Joseph Desloges who took part in the Battle of Britain.

 

A modified painting of a BCATP Fairey Battle

Two well-known RAF 264 Squadron pilot and air gunner

 

Pilots with RCAF 416 Squadron

 

425 Alouette Squadron (September 1944)

 

Buzz Beurling’s friend

 

 

 

Gordon McKenzie Hill, a RCAF 416 Squadron pilot

 

A Fleet Finch stationed at No.4 EFTS Windsor Mills, Quebec

 

Fleet Finches stationed at No.4 EFTS Windsor Mills, Quebec  (1940)

 

 

A Typhoon pilot

 

Gordon McKenzie Hill, a RCAF 416 Squadron pilot

 

425 Alouette Squadron Handley Page Halifax III

 

  

Laurent Lamontagne, a friend’s father

 

Jean-Paul Corbeil and Pierre Gauthier with 425 Alouette (May 1944)

 

“Tush” Laviolette (425 Squadron)

 

LAC Leslie Scott

 

P-40

 

Prang!

 

Sergeant Gérard Pelletier

 

Squadron Leader Chadburn (416 Squadron)

 

A Tiger Moth stationed at No.4 EFTS Windsor Mills, Quebec

 

Tiger Moths stationed at No.4 EFTS Windsor Mills, Quebec

 

Hawker Typhoon

 

Picture colorised for Clarence Simonsen to be used for an upcoming research.

Where was I the last time when I finished my last build?

I thought you would never ask!

Next time…

Curtiss P-40 Series I

More reading

Weapons and Warfare

Arguably the best-known fighter in the US Army Air Forces (USAAF) in the first year of direct American participation in the war was the Curtiss P-40. Designed by Donovan Reese Berlin, the prototype XP-40 was more evolutionary than revolutionary in conception, being nothing more than the tenth production airframe of Berlin’s P-36A Hawk fighter with an Allison V-1710 liquid-cooled inline engine substituted for the P-36’s 875-horsepower Wright GR-1820-G3 Cyclone air-cooled radial.

Donovan’s original monoplane design dated to 1934. He designated it the Curtiss Model 75, reflecting his obsession with that number, while the emotive nickname of “Hawk,” already famous from an earlier generation of Curtiss biplane fighters, was revived for the new-generation monoplane. Although the Hawk 75 first flew in 1935, engine problems delayed its development until July 7, 1937, when the Army Air Corps gave Curtiss the largest American peacetime production order up to that time—210 P-36s, as the…

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